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Turbonomic Blog

Steven Haines

A senior technologist, accomplished architect, author, and educator. As a technical architect and lead solution architect, I spent the better part of the past 6 years onsite at Disney in their architecture team building out the next generation of Disney's guest experience and leading various Disney solutions. I am passionate about technology and how technology can be used to improve guest/customer experience, with a strong focus demonstrating business value and ROI to my clients. As such, my specializations have been in performance and scalability, cloud-based architectures, high-availability, fault tolerance, business analytics, and integration with new and emerging technologies. As an author I have written two books on Java programming and one on Java Performance Management; I have written over 500 articles for publications such as InformIT.com (Pearson Education), JavaWorld, Dr Dobb's Journal, and more; and I have written over a dozen white papers and ebooks on performance management and cloud-based architectures to empower companies relay their product value to the market. I have an active column on VMTurbo's About Virtualization blog (http://vmturbo.com/about-virtualization)
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Recent Posts

Getting Started with Docker Swarm: Part 1

Posted by Steven Haines on Jul 18, 2016 8:58:34 PM

We’ve spent a lot of time reviewing Docker and Amazon’s Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) Container Service (ECS) as a strategy for clustering Docker containers. In this article we’re going to review the native clustering support that Docker provides through its Docker Swarm solution.

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Topics: Containers

Diving into Apache Spark: Part 4 of 4

Posted by Steven Haines on Jun 30, 2016 3:32:18 PM

The first articles in this series introduced Apache Spark, presented the traditional flow of a Spark applications, and reviewed the components that make Spark work and then we reviewed Spark’s distributed architecture to better understand how it operates across a cluster of machines and walked through setting up a Spark local working environment.

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Topics: Applications

Diving into Apache Spark: Part 3

Posted by Steven Haines on Jun 13, 2016 11:00:43 AM

The last articles (part 1, part 2) introduced Apache Spark, presented the traditional flow of a Spark applications, and reviewed the components that make Spark work. In this article we are going to look at Spark’s distributed architecture to better understand how it operates across a cluster of machines and then we’re going to walk through setting up a Spark local working environment.

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Topics: Applications

Diving into Apache Spark: Part 2

Posted by Steven Haines on Jun 1, 2016 9:17:36 PM

As we left off in our first article, we wanted to dive into the overview of what makes up an Apache Spark environment. Being so much more than just a single application, Apache Spark is comprised of multiple components.

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Topics: Applications

Diving into Apache Spark: Part 1

Posted by Steven Haines on May 24, 2016 12:53:33 PM

Our data has grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade: we have collected hoards of data about our users in Big Data solutions, like Hadoop, but we also have data stored in log files, local databases, Splunk, and more. How are we supposed to analyze this data and create a holistic view of this data across multiple data sources?

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Topics: Virtualization

Devs are from Venus, Ops are from Mars, Containers: Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) XII of XII

Posted by Steven Haines on May 11, 2016 11:30:23 AM

We have shared an exciting journey across the ECS landscape together.  We've covered a lot a ground in our series as you can see from the articles, so this is where we finish up as we tackle the last steps of our Zero Downtime Deployment on Amazon Elastic Container Services.

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Topics: Containers, DevOps

Devs are from Venus, Ops are from Mars, Containers: Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) XI

Posted by Steven Haines on Apr 14, 2016 3:12:54 PM

The past few articles have covered a lot of ground: we have reviewed what Docker is and how it works, we saw how Amazon’s EC2 Container Service (ECS) provides a solution for managing a cluster of Docker instances running in the cloud, we walked through the steps to setup an ECS cluster and deploy multiple services across a collection of EC2 instances, we reviewed different strategies for mapping ECS services to Docker containers, and we designed a production ECS application.

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Topics: DevOps

Devs are from Venus, Ops are from Mars, Containers: Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) X

Posted by Steven Haines on Mar 26, 2016 8:30:51 AM

The past few articles have covered a lot of ground: we have reviewed what Docker is and how it works, we saw how Amazon’s EC2 Container Service (ECS) provides a solution for managing a cluster of Docker instances running in the cloud, we walked through the steps to setup an ECS cluster and deploy multiple services across a collection of EC2 instances, and we reviewed different strategies for mapping ECS services to Docker containers. This installment provides a more holistic view of ECS by describing how to design a production application in ECS and how to wire together different application microservices into a single solution.

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Topics: Containers, DevOps

Devs are from Venus, Ops are from Mars, Containers: Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) IX

Posted by Steven Haines on Mar 15, 2016 2:06:20 PM

Welcome back to the next steps in launching our Nginx server on ECS.  We have most of the pieces in place, and our next step is just to finish creating our Nginx environment.

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Topics: Containers, DevOps

Devs are from Venus, Ops are from Mars, Containers: Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) VIII

Posted by Steven Haines on Feb 25, 2016 3:06:17 PM

The previous article reviewed how to run multiple Docker containers in ECS in the same ECS service by defining multiple containers in the same task definition. This is a good strategy when the Docker containers in question are tightly coupled: if one changes then it is expected that the other will change or if one is deployed then the other is deployed, such as when you want every one of your Tomcat instances to be behind an Nginx web server.

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Topics: Containers, DevOps

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